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Wild Yeast Ciabatta using Yeast Water and Bassinage Method

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© 2022 | http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com



© 2022 | http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com






© 2022 | http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com


Yeast is a living microorganism that feeds on carbohydrates / sugar and releases carbon dioxide and alcohol that helps to leaven bread and enable fermentation. Wild yeast is found everywhere in the nature and can be easily captured from plants and animals. Your skin is even home to different types of yeast.
Fresh fruits, vegetables, or herbs can be used to capture wild yeast, but the easiest way to capture wild yeast is to use dried fruit, making sure that the fruit ain't treated with sulfur dioxide. Fill a glass bottle with lukewarm water, add in dried fruit (and honey / sugar to speed up the fermentation process ). Seal the bottle with a ballon or a latex glove (as the yeast feeds on the sugar, it produces carbon dioxide and tremendous pressure can develop in the bottle ) and leave it at room temperature in a place away from direct sunlight or heat. The yeast is ready when bubbles appear and the liquid is frothy on top, which will take about 4-5 days. Strain out the liquid and use the wild yeast water for baking in place of both the liquid and baker’s yeast in recipes. You can also use the wild yeast water to make sourdough starter.You can discard the fruit or use it for baking.
Bassinage is a French term for pouring or bathing in water. In bread, the bassinage method makes the initial dough stiffer by holding back some of the water. After the gluten has developed, the second water is added to the dough. This method increases the amount of water that the dough can retain and produces a more open crumb.
Ciabatta is a rustic Italian bread that is usually made from wheat bread flour, water, olive oil, salt, and yeast. The name means “slipper” in Italian and refers to its elongated, broad, and flat shape, but you can form ciabatta into small squares or rolls. Ciabatta dough is wet and sticky with hydration levels often 80% or higher up to 95%. So it can be tricky to handle the dough and obtain those signature air bubbles within the dough. The taste will be same regardless of the crumb of your bread. Here are some very helpful tips on how to handle high hydration dough.
The soft, chewy texture and big, distinctively airy holes make ciabatta perfect for dunking into soups, sopping up sauce or absorbing seasoned oil. From breeding yeast water to the loaf of bread, it takes about 7 days. A slow and long process, but the result is definitely worth your time and patience.

Wild Yeast Ciabatta using Yeast Water and Bassinage Method

adapted from Marcel Paa
Cultivating Yeast WaterRefreshing Yeast WaterDough
  • 250 g Water (approx. 35C/95F)
  • 70 g Dried fruit (e.g. dates, sultanas, figs, apricots)
  • 20 g Honey
  • 200-220 g Yeast water from above
  • 500 g Water (approx. 35C/95F)
  • 20 g Honey
  • 20 g Sultanas
  • 70 g Active yeast water
  • 500 g Bread flour
  • 20 g Olive oil
  • 9 g Salt
  • 20 g Active yeast water
Cultivating Yeast Water
Refreshing Yeast Water
For the Dough
  1. To cultivate wild yeast water : Use hot water to rinse the bottle and pour in the 250 ml warm water. Then add the honey and finally the dried fruit. Depending on the type of dried fruit, cut it into small pieces so that it comes out of the bottle after swelling. Shake the bottle until the honey has dissolved and close the bottle with a balloon or a latex glove. Leave the bottle at room temperature for 4-5 days. During these days, shake the bottle a little every now and then so that new oxygen gets in.
  2. To refresh the yeast water : To do this, put the wild yeast water, warm water, honey and sultanas in a glass bottle and close it tightly. Shake the bottle to mix all the ingredients. Replace the bottle cap with a balloon. Leave it to ferment at room temperature for 12-24 hours.
  3. To prepare the dough : After 12-24 hours, the sultanas float on the yeast water and this means that it's strong enough to ferment the dough.
  4. Carefully remove the balloon from the bottle and pour the yeast water through a sieve into the mixing bowl of your mixer. Add in the remaining ingredients and knead for 2-3 minutes on slow speed.
  5. Increase the mixer speed and knead the dough for about 8-10 minutes at medium speed until it passes the "window test". Gradually fold the second part of water into the dough until the dough has completely absorbed the liquid.
  6. In a lightly greased rectangular container, place the dough and cover with a plastic film. Leave it to rest for 12-16 hours at room temperature.
  7. During that time, stretch and fold the dough 2-3 times. To do this, dip your hands in a little water beforehand, then pull the dough up slightly on one side and place it on the opposite side of the container. Repeat this process from all four sides. Then cover the dough again and let it rest.
  8. After the proofing time, turn the dough out onto a generously floured work surface and divide into two equal portions. Pull the dough towards the conter from each side to form a "slipper". Place it on a generously floured tea towel on a baking tray with the seal facing upwards. Cover the dough with the towel and leave to rise for 40 minutes at room temperature.
  9. Preheat the oven to 230C/450F with a baking stone in the middle of oven and a baking tray at the bottom.
  10. Place the dough, with the seal side down, on a floured bread shovel and push them directly onto the baking stone in the oven. I simply turned the dough onto a well floured parchment paper and place it directly onto the baking stone. Pour a glass of water into the baking tray at the bottome of the oven and close the oven door immediately.
  11. Now reduce the oven temperature to 220C/430F and bake the loaves for 15 minutes. Now open the oven door to let the steam escape and then bake the loaves for another 25 minutes until crispy. Cool the loaves on a wire rack.

© 2022 | http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com



© 2022 | http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com


© 2022 | http://angiesrecipes.blogspot.com




40 comments:

Brian 29/5/22 00:59

I want some, that sounds fabulous!

[Reply]
J.P. Alexander 29/5/22 03:27

Uy que rico pan, gracias por la receta. La haré pronto. Te mando un beso.

[Reply]
kathyinozarks 29/5/22 05:30

Beautiful loaves of bread Angie, and your recipe sounds delicious

[Reply]
Graciela Bacino 29/5/22 06:21

A comer rico!!

[Reply]
Margaret D 29/5/22 08:09

Look lovely, interesting reading on yeast too..thank you for sharing.

[Reply]
Lola Martínez 29/5/22 09:40

Ojalá tuviera yo esos conocimientos que te llevan a preparar un pan tan espectacular. Saludos.

[Reply]
Federica Simoni 29/5/22 10:59

Wow bellissimo!!!!😍😍😍😍😍

[Reply]
Liz That Skinny Chick Can Bake 29/5/22 11:46

What a gorgeous, rustic loaf!! Perfect for dipping in oil or smearing with butter!!!

[Reply]
My name is Erika. 29/5/22 13:10

I didn't know about making bread with dried fruit. This is really fascinating. And your bread looks delicious too. Hugs-Erika

[Reply]
DEZMOND 29/5/22 13:18

They don't look appetizing on the outside, but I bet they were soft and nom nom nom on the inside.

[Reply]
Anonymous 29/5/22 13:46

Angie, You are certainly a master bread baker. This ciabatta looks fabulous. Your family is so lucky to get to try all of your wonderful baking.

[Reply]
Angie's Recipes 29/5/22 14:44

@DEZMOND That's how they are supposed to look...simple, rustic slipper look.

[Reply]
Kitchen Riffs 29/5/22 17:19

What an interesting method for making bread! The texture of the crumb is really nice. Bet the flavor is outstanding. Thanks!

[Reply]
shirleysimplerecipe 29/5/22 21:36

The bread looks delicious 😃!

[Reply]
rodzinatestuje 29/5/22 21:46

It looks really amazing :)

[Reply]
Velva 29/5/22 23:54

Angie, (not sure my comments are posting) As you know, I spent some time in Europe, and the Europeans have bread right! These rustic style breads are so good. Love the idea of wild yeast. Here in Florida the humidity can make it a challenge.

[Reply]
Valentina 30/5/22 00:42

Now I know where the chive butter is going. ;-) I'd never heard of the Bassinage method. Love learning new cooing things. Thank you! :-) ~Valentina

[Reply]
mjskit 30/5/22 00:59

I can think of 1001 ways to enjoy this beautiful bread!

[Reply]
Nammi 30/5/22 07:06

oh I didnt know you can make yeast using dried fruit. We always have dried fruit and raisins around the house. Will it give a sweet taste? Have to try this during the school break

[Reply]
speedy70 30/5/22 09:29

Un ottimo pane rustico, complimenti!!!!!

[Reply]
Whats Cookin Italian Style Cuisine 30/5/22 14:20

wow that looks so perfect I love this kind of bread!

[Reply]
Ben | Havocinthekitchen 30/5/22 15:41

This bread looks beautiful! And cultivating your own yeast? You are adventurous for sure!

[Reply]
Ben | Havocinthekitchen 30/5/22 15:41
This comment has been removed by the author.
[Reply]
Jeff the Chef 30/5/22 16:22

I've nevertried this method, either the yeast or the hydration. The results look spectacular!

[Reply]
Marissa 30/5/22 18:38

Look at that gorgeous crumb!! You are an amazing baker, Angie. This bread is a must try!

[Reply]
DEZMOND 30/5/22 19:10

@Angie's RecipesI know, I just prefer them nice yellow and shiny. But I bet they were tasty especially with that lovely chives butter you made previously.

[Reply]
Muriel 30/5/22 22:18

Superbe pain avec sa belle mie alvéolée !

[Reply]
DeniseinVA 31/5/22 02:20

Hi Angie, your Ciabatta bread looks fantastic, thank you for another great recipe :)

[Reply]
Rose world 31/5/22 07:26

I love ciabatta. Like it better with add on like raisin, apricots on it. Yours looked amazing.

[Reply]
Nancy Chan 31/5/22 09:20

You bake beautiful bread.

[Reply]
savorthebest 31/5/22 14:50

What a beautiful loaf of ciabatta. It looks delicious, Angie.

[Reply]
David 1/6/22 02:46

Angie, While I do love bread like this, we don't eat a lot of bread so we need multi-use bread. Dipping ciabatta bread into soup or stew is a great pleasure, but butter or mayonnaise when making a sandwich...struggles with all those holes. Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

[Reply]
Angie's Recipes 1/6/22 14:08

@NammiIt wouldn't taste like sweet bread if that's what you are wondering, but it does give the bread a slightly sweet note.

[Reply]
Tisa Jacob 1/6/22 19:59

Such gorgeous pictures. The loaf looks amazing, with a nice crust and the texture inside!

[Reply]
Raymund 2/6/22 04:36

That ciabatta looks amazing, well done Angie

[Reply]
thepaintedapron.com 2/6/22 15:15

You make the most beautiful breads and your yeast explanation is very scientific and explanatory. I know your bread is incredible!

[Reply]
Pam 2/6/22 17:53

Beautiful! Beautiful! Beautiful!

[Reply]


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